Marverine Cole

Totally Loopy Lou

Registered Shopper
Some people didn't know who she was by her name. I described her as a woman of colour so they would recall her more easily. Did I do something wrong, Sister?
No you didn’t do anything wrong as you were just trying to help someone who didn’t know who she was identify and her skin colour is a way of doing that - especially since I think she was the only black female presenter back then?

They’ve improved diversity a bit since!

(Think “black” is more PC than POC and I believe that’s how she describes herself.
Plus PoC is a bit American and can be contentious so I understand - long story!)

Why not say 'dark hair brown eyes,, birmingham accent? I really cba to extrapolate further as these things can become so tedious.
As I just replied to Grizelda, using her skin colour in a purely descriptive way to help identify her quickly to someone who was struggling to picture her, is fine!
Think
 

Grizelda

Registered Shopper
No you didn’t do anything wrong as you were just trying to help someone who didn’t know who she was identify and her skin colour is a way of doing that - especially since I think she was the only black female presenter back then?

They’ve improved diversity a bit since!

(Think “black” is more PC than POC and I believe that’s how she describes herself.
Plus PoC is a bit American and can be contentious so I understand - long story!)
Thanks, Loopy.
 

Brissles

Registered Shopper
In a recent court case publicised in the press, Judge Stephen Wyeth stated "Need it be said, freedom of expression, including a qualified right to offend when expressing views and beliefs.... is a fundamental right in a democratic society"

Posters on here are regular contributors who are nice people with a sense of humour and who would never go out of their way to offend. We've all been pounced upon at one time or another for a comment made, but equally we shouldn't feel like we are walking on egg shells before we do post anything.
 

SisterBliss

Registered Shopper
In a recent court case publicised in the press, Judge Stephen Wyeth stated "Need it be said, freedom of expression, including a qualified right to offend when expressing views and beliefs.... is a fundamental right in a democratic society"

Posters on here are regular contributors who are nice people with a sense of humour and who would never go out of their way to offend. We've all been pounced upon at one time or another for a comment made, but equally we shouldn't feel like we are walking on egg shells before we do post anything.
I don't believe G was trying to offend. Neither was I 'pouncing'.

When the white (presenters) are descibed, nobody has ever used their skin colour as an 'aide memoire'.

It is unnecessary to do so with black presenters & perhaps a little clumsy/idle. For those people who struggle to remember, or weren't watching back then, google is available (if they need to know about those mentioned on the forum.) Seems some already have googled with regard to the info about MC's daliance with the police.
I don't believe that G was trying to offend in any way, & welcome FOS & humour.
 

stratobuddy

Registered Shopper
I listen to radio 4 most of the day, and it is amazing how many times it is revealed that someone is black.

For example, a presenter may ask "did you find it harder to enter that profession being black?" or the person herself may say "it was a bit difficult as a black person growing up in a white area".

In most cases, it is usually not relevant to the programme, but the radio ALWAYS makes sure, one way or another, that the listener knows that someone is black. They use the word black, not say things like they have brown eyes and an afro hairstyle, for example.

Or if black is not an accurate description, they say "a person of colour" whatever that means (does that include the colour pinkish?)
 
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maymorganlondon

Registered Shopper
Personally I steer clear of using skin colour as an identifier as what is acceptable in the morning is offensive by evening. It's too much of a minefield, and as SB mentioned, unless we use skin colour to identify everyone we have to move on from that shorthand. Nobody means to be offensive, and nobody needs to take offense.
 

misiuszka

Registered Shopper
I think using a colour is descriptive when referring to a minority. If there were a group of 20 women, 1 of whom was white I would refer to her as the white woman if I wanted to point her out to someone. Likewise if there was 1 person in a wheelchair in 20 people I'd refer to them as the one in the wheelchair.
 

Brissles

Registered Shopper
Equally when identifying someone when giving a description to the Police, in terms of " it was 3 white men" etc In the days before before mass immigration it would have been taken as read that the 3 men were white. Therefore colour now is used as a means of identification.
 

Clothescloth

Registered Shopper
My 13 year old grandson has (very!) ginger hair, and is often identified or described by his hair colour. He, or none of the family have ever been offended.
 
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