Capsule wardrobe update

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merryone

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Jun 24, 2008
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Following on from my efforts to make myself a "capsule wardrobe" back in the summer of 2019. I thought I'd give an update from what I've achieved/learned from the exercise.
On the good side of things, my wardrobe hasn't grown since my cull, as I've been working on a strictly one in, one out basis. It could never be described as a "capsule" as I still have more clothes than I need, but I am pleased to say that pretty much all my separates work well together.
I have learned that the "must have" wardrobe staples that are in every capsule did not work for me. The trench coat, I think I wore once before eventually donating it, the plain white t shirt, did not look good with anything whatsoever, so now wear as a vest underneath my work uniform in the colder months, the well cut plain black trousers, always looked too formal and I never felt comfortable in them - donated those too, black wool mini skirt (not too short) still got but hardly wear - too officey.
The stuff I love and still wear regularly are a satiny midi skirt, the Joules breton striped top and a loose fitting stripey shirt and the Wallis jeans I got still get a good airing...but considering how much I spent on all that clobber, that's not an awful lot of "hits"
I've definitely learned not to spend a lot of money on t shirts - 2 of them were terrible quality and have since been thrown in the bin, a sweatshirt from the same brand has faded and gone crispy (Hush brand - avoid at all costs) and the plain grey French connection t shirt I paid more than I should have for got badly splashed with cooking oil and had to be discarded - I tried everything to remove the stain but it remained sadly. Had it been a £3 Primark job it wouldn't have mattered.
So in summary - a capsule wardrobe is a bad idea, but keeping the amount of clothes you have in check is a good one.
Buying clothes in colours that compliment one another is a good idea. Trading up to higher end brands isn't worth it either. I don't like the idea of throw away fashion but at least if something wears out or gets spoiled you can chuck it without without being too annoyed. Cheap n' cheerful all the way from now on, clothes as when they're needed from my catalogue - can't go wrong. The pyjamas which I bought 3 years ago for £12 and have been worn extremely frequently throughout our lockdowns still wash up like new!
 
Following on from my efforts to make myself a "capsule wardrobe" back in the summer of 2019. I thought I'd give an update from what I've achieved/learned from the exercise.
On the good side of things, my wardrobe hasn't grown since my cull, as I've been working on a strictly one in, one out basis. It could never be described as a "capsule" as I still have more clothes than I need, but I am pleased to say that pretty much all my separates work well together.
I have learned that the "must have" wardrobe staples that are in every capsule did not work for me. The trench coat, I think I wore once before eventually donating it, the plain white t shirt, did not look good with anything whatsoever, so now wear as a vest underneath my work uniform in the colder months, the well cut plain black trousers, always looked too formal and I never felt comfortable in them - donated those too, black wool mini skirt (not too short) still got but hardly wear - too officey.
The stuff I love and still wear regularly are a satiny midi skirt, the Joules breton striped top and a loose fitting stripey shirt and the Wallis jeans I got still get a good airing...but considering how much I spent on all that clobber, that's not an awful lot of "hits"
I've definitely learned not to spend a lot of money on t shirts - 2 of them were terrible quality and have since been thrown in the bin, a sweatshirt from the same brand has faded and gone crispy (Hush brand - avoid at all costs) and the plain grey French connection t shirt I paid more than I should have for got badly splashed with cooking oil and had to be discarded - I tried everything to remove the stain but it remained sadly. Had it been a £3 Primark job it wouldn't have mattered.
So in summary - a capsule wardrobe is a bad idea, but keeping the amount of clothes you have in check is a good one.
Buying clothes in colours that compliment one another is a good idea. Trading up to higher end brands isn't worth it either. I don't like the idea of throw away fashion but at least if something wears out or gets spoiled you can chuck it without without being too annoyed. Cheap n' cheerful all the way from now on, clothes as when they're needed from my catalogue - can't go wrong. The pyjamas which I bought 3 years ago for £12 and have been worn extremely frequently throughout our lockdowns still wash up like new!
I like the idea of a capsule wardrobe which includes clothes for every/any occasion. Your satiny midi skirt sounds nice (I imagine it as blue/grey.) I've got some keepers ... fancy skirts and tops I can't bear to part with, but mostly my wardrobe consists of trousers and blouses that can all be worn with each other. Not very exciting, but easy and at least I feel presentable.
 
The skirt's a dusty pink and it goes with everything I've got. Like you I liked the idea of a capsule wardrobe but to follow the rules to the letter would've been far too restrictive, especially when it came down to dresses, most of the capsules I saw suggested having just 1 (don't be silly!) I don't regret giving it a go because it gave me the impetus to organise all my clothes, and taught me that I can definitely live with less, also that the pricier brands aren't always better quality, and do not have to follow a prescriptive mould. If you like smart skirts, trousers and trench coats..buy them but if you've lived without them for years there's probably a good reason for that!
 
I have a sub capsule... jeans!! I have loads of stuff I'm not wearing, but may do when my office reopens. But I have donated loads of stuff, both because it doesn't fit, but also because it represents a fantasy self rather than the real me.
Good questions to ask yourself about your clothes:
1. Does it fit?
2. Do you feel good in it?
3. Do you look good in it?
4. Does it represent the real life you lead?
5. If you didn't own it would you buy it?
6. If it got lost or damaged would you replace it?
 
A black roll neck top is said to be an important part of a capsule wardrobe, as well as a good pair of black trousers. When I had my clear out, I found that I had about ten black roll neck tops and six or seven pairs of black trousers. Lots of them were the wrong size and/or needed altering. I chucked out most of them, and feel so much better for it. Same with unworn blouses and jumpers. I feel 10 lbs lighter !
 
The skirt's a dusty pink and it goes with everything I've got. Like you I liked the idea of a capsule wardrobe but to follow the rules to the letter would've been far too restrictive, especially when it came down to dresses, most of the capsules I saw suggested having just 1 (don't be silly!) I don't regret giving it a go because it gave me the impetus to organise all my clothes, and taught me that I can definitely live with less, also that the pricier brands aren't always better quality, and do not have to follow a prescriptive mould. If you like smart skirts, trousers and trench coats..buy them but if you've lived without them for years there's probably a good reason for that!
Dusty pink skirt ... sounds 'dreamy' as one QVC presenters would say. It's probably one of your keepers. I got rid of my Burberry trench. Far too formal for my present life style. I bought a Jules rain jacket. It works for me OK, but the sizing is on the small side ... too short sleeves and a bit of a bum freezer, but I didn't return it. I don't have any occasion now to wear dresses, so I don't have any, but I like maxi skirts. I don't like to tuck in my tops, however. (I did buy a dress from a Greek company QVC used to represent (Join ?), but never wore it, so out it went.)
 
A black roll neck top is said to be an important part of a capsule wardrobe, as well as a good pair of black trousers. When I had my clear out, I found that I had about ten black roll neck tops and six or seven pairs of black trousers. Lots of them were the wrong size and/or needed altering. I chucked out most of them, and feel so much better for it. Same with unworn blouses and jumpers. I feel 10 lbs lighter !
Yes, and tbh most of these capsules are designed for the office worker who doesn't want to get a name for herself for wearing the same clothes day in day out. Having worked in offices, I know for certain that this does happen - "If Shirley wears that jumper one more day, it'll need it's own office" "yes, and preferably on the top floor 'cause it must stink"!
These capsules seem to completely overlook the need for any kind of leisure wear, or occasion wear - The simple grey wrap dress won't take you to the "ambassador's ball" will it? Nor will your good black trouser/crisp white shirt combo be much good for taking the dog to the rec!
I blindly bought, without considering that half of these clothes wouldn't fit into my lifestyle, and spent a small fortune in the process. We live and learn don't we?
 
I have a sub capsule... jeans!! I have loads of stuff I'm not wearing, but may do when my office reopens. But I have donated loads of stuff, both because it doesn't fit, but also because it represents a fantasy self rather than the real me.
Good questions to ask yourself about your clothes:
1. Does it fit?
2. Do you feel good in it?
3. Do you look good in it?
4. Does it represent the real life you lead?
5. If you didn't own it would you buy it?
6. If it got lost or damaged would you replace it?
My Mr T was back in surgery yesterday so I gave myself a long list of things to fill my time & decided to analyse my wardrobe; every question was answered with 'yes', even if Q3 made me feel conceited. I must know myself pretty well.
 

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