Liz Earle - the person

brissles

VIP Shopper
Following on from my above comment, I cannot understand why pregnant slebs have to expose their well expanded bellies to the world, - it does nothing for me, nor I suspect to anyone else. Pure vanity, and TBH not something I want to see.
 

donna255

VIP Shopper
Well, brissles according to the Daily Mail all pregnant women flaunt their baby bumps. Even if they are covered up in loose clothing.
 

alter ego

VIP Shopper
Those who have written about your health concerns are brave, honest & proof that good health, mental & physical, is everything. Presumably it's only been within the past century that the majority of women have experienced all these issues with the menopause because only the upper class would have lived long enough; I saw the shocked faces of girls in a history lesson when I told them the average life expectancy for a woman in 1841 was 43.
My dad nearly died from an infection in a small scratch pre-war. It was only constant hot bread poultices saved his hand (and probably his life - he lost his thumb). This was pre antibiotics.

I was brought up with parents, grandparents and neighbours who were terrified of gangrene and would always watch for signs of what we now call sepsis after a cut. Although antibiotics had become freely available, people used to losing their friends and family within days to blood poisoning couldn't get used to not looking out for it.

In such a short time it seems like younger people are completely unaware of how their families lived less than 100 years ago. I've heard today that we're now no longer measles-free due to people (stupid, listening to even stupider people on FB IMHO) not vaccinating. I'd listen to my mum and nan talk of people who'd lost their children to childhood diseases like measles. Mum insisted on me having mine and my sister (lot older than me) vaccinating my nieces. She was genuinely terrified that if we didn't we'd succumb to these diseases and she'd lose us. Apparently, complications led to death more than disablement back then.

It seems it's not just disease either. Death in childbirth rates are up in this country - still rare, thankfully - but not surprising the way women are being treated in labour these days. It seems to me (though I've only experienced it second-hand with one of my nieces and more recently, the daughters of two friends) that the medical profession would rather see women labour for a week with extreme difficulty than perform C-section. All three of these young women have been kept in 7/8 days, costing the NHS more than if they'd done the C-sections two had asked for in their plan!

I'm ranting now (I blame menopause :mysmilie_13::mysmilie_11:) so time to get off my soapbox.
 

alter ego

VIP Shopper
I've worked in a mental health unit, so I know how ill many are with mental issues, and that there is never enough funding for the department.

I do feel though that once a celeb starts giving interviews about their journey or battle with an ailment, then it becomes bandwagon for the rest of the celebrity world to jump on if it gives then 'coverage'.

Personally I'm fed up with the numerous magazine articles and newspaper column inches given over to the likes of Carol Vorderman, Andrea McLean, Jane McDonald, Chloe Maddeley, the Nolans, Jenny Éclair, Nadya Hussein - the list is endless, of how they coped with anxiety, panic attacks, menopause etc etc.

Surprisingly it hasn't stopped any one of them from stepping in front of the camera in front of millions - quite big in terms of having an anxiety attack I would have thought ? or getting dolled up for yet another red carpet appearance.

Sorry, but those I witnessed in the mental unit, could barely make it through the day - not just once, but for months/years on end with their problems, so I really have no time for Vorderman and the rest of them.
Another who'd like to thank you, although I went through several CBT counsellors before I found "the one" and the difference in care/training/approach astounded me. My friend is a now retired CPN. She used to tell me how heartbreaking some cases were. She also told me what sh!ts some of the staff were, too. One male CPN would dose the patients he didn't like before discharge so they'd be left collapsed and incontinent not long after leaving hospital. God knows how he treated others under his care. I hope Karma's got his name.

I couldn't leave the house for years when my mental health was bad. I was too anxious to go into my back garden to hang washing in case one of my neighbours wanted to say hello. My washing only got dried when there were no cars either side!

Totally agree with you about the same people coat-tailing the same people. When one starts they all go. Maybe they have a bit of sheep DNA in them. I notice MM now has her own range of menopause products she sells. I won't be trying them.

I am grateful to some of them for bringing menopause treatments to the fore, though. I'd still be on tablets that made my anxiety worse than it had been my whole life if I hadn't heard CV on Lorraine mention she uses a gel.

Oddly enough after reading up about it and even printing the name and guidelines from NICE and giving it to them, three female GPs denied its existence. As did one female gynae. (Is it nasty to hope that one day they suffer like I do?) Only my lovely current gynae confirmed I wasn't imagining it existed and gave it to me - and it's helped more than anything. I feel sorry for women who do get on with the tab (Elleste Duet) as it's now on the short-and-soon-to-be-missing list according to the British Menopause Society. Wonder what those GPs/gynaes are giving women now?

Thanks, Brissles :heart:
 

brissles

VIP Shopper
Well, brissles according to the Daily Mail all pregnant women flaunt their baby bumps. Even if they are covered up in loose clothing.
Sorry, I should have said 'naked' baby bumps.
 

alter ego

VIP Shopper
I've always been annoyed when people have said "I'm starving" only a few hours after eating their last meal & feel the same way about someone saying they're depressed because the weather's bad, they've broken a nail or their favourite has been eliminated from a reality show. Our younger daughter was bullied when she started her first teaching job, the only career she'd ever wanted, her slide into the deepest depression was horrendous & the recovery took all of her strength & mine. She came through but when she had her baby last year I watched her for signs that she was about to go under. She's fine, & more importantly, aware that she's ok but it shocked me to the core & made me think again about the fragility of life. I do wonder if this was the point that I looked at the vapid commercialism of selly telly & saw it for what it is.
Glad your daughter pulled through - she's so lucky to have you. I wish my mum had been around to help me. I felt so alone that it made me realise that a support network of family and friends is the most important part of life.

I had PND (another thing I blame on hormones!) and suffered awful depression after my miscarriages - again I believe my hormones played a major part). I wouldn't wish it on anyone.
 

brissles

VIP Shopper
Another who'd like to thank you, although I went through several CBT counsellors before I found "the one" and the difference in care/training/approach astounded me. My friend is a now retired CPN. She used to tell me how heartbreaking some cases were. She also told me what sh!ts some of the staff were, too. One male CPN would dose the patients he didn't like before discharge so they'd be left collapsed and incontinent not long after leaving hospital. God knows how he treated others under his care. I hope Karma's got his name.

I couldn't leave the house for years when my mental health was bad. I was too anxious to go into my back garden to hang washing in case one of my neighbours wanted to say hello. My washing only got dried when there were no cars either side!

Totally agree with you about the same people coat-tailing the same people. When one starts they all go. Maybe they have a bit of sheep DNA in them. I notice MM now has her own range of menopause products she sells. I won't be trying them.

I am grateful to some of them for bringing menopause treatments to the fore, though. I'd still be on tablets that made my anxiety worse than it had been my whole life if I hadn't heard CV on Lorraine mention she uses a gel.

Oddly enough after reading up about it and even printing the name and guidelines from NICE and giving it to them, three female GPs denied its existence. As did one female gynae. (Is it nasty to hope that one day they suffer like I do?) Only my lovely current gynae confirmed I wasn't imagining it existed and gave it to me - and it's helped more than anything. I feel sorry for women who do get on with the tab (Elleste Duet) as it's now on the short-and-soon-to-be-missing list according to the British Menopause Society. Wonder what those GPs/gynaes are giving women now?

Thanks, Brissles :heart:

Bless you, and hope your life is more bearable now.

Your inability to leave the house resonated with me, as I was 13 years old when my Mum suffered her breakdown and became housebound at age 35. While Dad worked I had to pick up the pieces of the daily household, like getting 2 younger brothers ready for school, taking them there and picking them up, plus doing the food shopping. With the help of medication Mum coped much better, but then was unable to come of the tablets, which in the 60's were Valium, Parstellin and Librium. She lived until age 82, and was still taking medication for her 'nerves'. So when in later years I worked with the mentally ill, I gained a much better insight into what my Mum was going through and the feelings of hopelessness she felt at the time.
 

maymorganlondon

VIP Shopper
So many women, and men, had their lives messed up by prescription tranquilisers. The "easy" solution when someone went to see a GP and fit a sterotype. My mum was prescribed valium and librium when she was in her early 40's. She had early symptoms of multiple sclerosis. One of my friends fathers was given tranquilisers he could never come off, and it robbed him of his career in law and meant his wife having to go out to work as well as caring for him.

Fortunately the medical profession is getting more enlightened...though you still have to be assertive with them when the trained-in arrogance peeps through, I find. Having lived with medical students and spent far too much time around medics, this is my experience, so I make no apology.
 

alter ego

VIP Shopper
Following on from my above comment, I cannot understand why pregnant slebs have to expose their well expanded bellies to the world, - it does nothing for me, nor I suspect to anyone else. Pure vanity, and TBH not something I want to see.
Me neither. Not keen on the current fashion for flopping both boobs out in cafes to breast feed either. I managed to do it discreetly, as do many others but I was in a Starbucks last year where several women were sitting on sofas literally topless feeding their little ones. If I hadn't been so sure they were loving the attention I'd have gone over and told them about the two men taking pictures of them.

I wonder what Starbucks (other cafes are available) thinks of groups like this. They came in just before me so it gave me the opportunity to see reactions of others coming in. The women themselves were being very loud and looked to be playing to the (lack of) crowd. Apart from myself, there were two single men (the ones sneakily taking photos). A few minutes later a group of about 7-8 teen boys came through the door, started sniggering and pointing then left. A few women in couples came in and sat, a couple (clearly Muslim) turned away when they saw the "show" as did a few older couples. Although the'd bought their coffees, Starbucks clearly lost business while they were there.

I see many women with their partners or mums quietly breastfeeding when I do get out but I don't get this public display that some of these women feel they have to put on. Do they think they're the first/only women in history that have managed to feed their babies? Same goes with the bumps. Do they think they're the only women who have sported a bump? That they're that special?
 

brissles

VIP Shopper
Ok, sorry to bang on about Carol Vorderman, but here we go.

She's been martyred in the press and tv for 'coming out' and 'being honest' about her menopausal experiences, her 'battle' with depression and coping with the aftermath of her mother dying. Which she has done in spades for about a couple of years (but feels like forever!).

NOW there are magazine articles abound, where she has recently told the world that her 50's are the best years EVER and that she loves to party.. HARD !

Sadly I'm not on Twitter, but how I'd love to say to her "FFS Vorderman make your sodding mind up !" - one minute she's on the floor with depression and feeling suicidal and now miraculously, like Lazarus rising from the dead, she's had the best decade in her life.

I'm coming to the conclusion that her persistent about turns, could be one of the reasons why she's been left high and dry by the blokes in her life.

Oh, and Carol ? there was SOOOO much publicity about you flying around the world 3 years ago, that's another thing your life that appears to have hit the buffers ! Never mind, just carry on wearing skin tight clothes and posing for the cameras, because that's all you seem suited for lately.
 

donna255

VIP Shopper
Well said brissles.

I remember when she did Strictly and got voted out by the public pretty early on. At the final where all the celebs return, she is the only one who refused(not due to work committments). Oh no how dare the public not love her.:mysmilie_19:
 

SisterBliss

Active member
I never read anything about women's health; I've always attended the necessary screening appointments & know what I have to do with regards alcohol, diet & lifestyle so other women's stories are irrelevant as far as I'm concerned. This has become even more apparent since I had my menopause, it happened two months after I was 50 & can only be described as a non-event leaving me with a few weeks of hot flashes a couple of times a year & no other problems. I can't think of a single woman I've ever known who experienced the problems these celebs endure, that could be down to many things, not least the fact that they knew it was part of life & just got on with it. The most recent photo I saw of Liz Earle showed a woman who looked as though her face had been ironed it was so devoid of character.
You sound really lucky, T. My Mom had & still has terrible hotties, starting chest upwards, goes red & can sweat, but I don't think her brain frazzled as some say happens to them. I'm really dreading this as my MH is delicate already & I'm a 'hot' person....eek. I don't really have anyone for advice either....
 

brissles

VIP Shopper
There's no 'road map' for the menopause. My mum too suffered with the lot ! heavy periods, sweats, irritability, depression and everything else during her 50's, and saw an end to her menstrual cycle in her late 50's.

Me on the other hand saw the end of my periods when I was 42, had a few hot flushes and that was it.

I do wonder if being childless has a bearing on this, because like me, I have a handful of friends who are childless too, and likewise have suffered no life changing effects of the menopause. (I might be wrong though). It does seem to be a common denominator with us all however.
 

Twilight

VIP Shopper
You sound really lucky, T. My Mom had & still has terrible hotties, starting chest upwards, goes red & can sweat, but I don't think her brain frazzled as some say happens to them. I'm really dreading this as my MH is delicate already & I'm a 'hot' person....eek. I don't really have anyone for advice either....
In another post I've written that a midwife told me I was of peasant stock so that could be the reason. I've always been a warm person, heat not heart, so the flashes I do get don't really make much difference. I'm also quite positive, except when it comes to cruelty to animals & what humans are doing to the planet, don't have dark moods & the only time I get twizzled is when confronted by a large spider or having to get on a plane. Fundamentally I think I'm quite shallow so maybe all parts of my reproductive system are as well.
 

maymorganlondon

VIP Shopper
There's no 'road map' for the menopause. My mum too suffered with the lot ! heavy periods, sweats, irritability, depression and everything else during her 50's, and saw an end to her menstrual cycle in her late 50's.

Me on the other hand saw the end of my periods when I was 42, had a few hot flushes and that was it.

I do wonder if being childless has a bearing on this, because like me, I have a handful of friends who are childless too, and likewise have suffered no life changing effects of the menopause. (I might be wrong though). It does seem to be a common denominator with us all however.
No kids here and neither time I had a menopause was fun. Not as bad as some, but No walk in the park.
 

alter ego

VIP Shopper
Ok, sorry to bang on about Carol Vorderman, but here we go.

She's been martyred in the press and tv for 'coming out' and 'being honest' about her menopausal experiences, her 'battle' with depression and coping with the aftermath of her mother dying. Which she has done in spades for about a couple of years (but feels like forever!).

NOW there are magazine articles abound, where she has recently told the world that her 50's are the best years EVER and that she loves to party.. HARD !

Sadly I'm not on Twitter, but how I'd love to say to her "FFS Vorderman make your sodding mind up !" - one minute she's on the floor with depression and feeling suicidal and now miraculously, like Lazarus rising from the dead, she's had the best decade in her life.

I'm coming to the conclusion that her persistent about turns, could be one of the reasons why she's been left high and dry by the blokes in her life.

Oh, and Carol ? there was SOOOO much publicity about you flying around the world 3 years ago, that's another thing your life that appears to have hit the buffers ! Never mind, just carry on wearing skin tight clothes and posing for the cameras, because that's all you seem suited for lately.
I don't read mags or online stuff about slebs so no idea her history. The only time I've seen her is either as a guest about menopause on Lorraine or guest presenting it.

All my mates laugh at me for recording Lorraine and This Morning but I do like the medical segments on them. I always fly through the slebs/agony aunt/ soaps/stupid people stuff (I don't even have to stop and listen since they helpfully have a banner on the bottom now). I like Dr Chris and Dr Ranj(?) but that awful vain doc on Lorraine needs dumping now. He has a serious attitude problem with overweight people and now needs to accept he's going bald and throw away his hair gel!

Back to CV. I see she's now dragging her daughter into TV land but the funniest thing I've heard is her blaming her menopause on the sudden appearance of the knockers that look enormous since she started wearing bandage dresses.

I'm still thankful she brought HRT gel to my notice, though.
 

SisterBliss

Active member
I think this is why it's come as such a shock to me.

I was ALWAYS as strong as a horse and healthy with it. I had heavy periods and miserable PMS but got on with it and always apologised to anyone (mostly very close people - we always hurt the ones we love) I may have offended during "that" week.

Nothing stopped me doing anything or got in my way of living life the way I wanted when I was younger but this... this is just debilitating. The only other thing I suffered with that hit me this hard was depression and anxiety as I simply couldn't function properly as my mind was just flat. I've always said that depression and anxiety can stop someone's life as firmly as most physical health problems.

Without good mental health you simply don't put up a fight.

It probably is made worse by the physical symptoms on TM but I've fought that as hard as I can (whenever my mental health hasn't been compromised by my bloody hormones). I think this is why so many women are prescribed antidepressants at menopause. They present with anxiety so they're given something that does work short-term.

As someone who's mum suffered osteoporosis in the spine which eventually killed her, though, I'd always tell a menopausal woman to get her bones checked regularly so they can keep them in good health. HRT helps with that and many of the other physical problems us 20%-ers suffer whereas antidepressants don't.

I was always proud of my peasant stock and ultra-wide hips for easy childbirth, too :mysmilie_3: I knew I'd pay for my good luck somewhere along the way. Karma's a bitch.
My Mom is 72 & although her periods stopped perhaps at 60 (after going from Tampax regular to super plus, plus a pad & nighttime changes) she still has dreadful flushes & sweats, see previous post. She didn't seem bitchy when men. was happening, (although if she still has the flushes I'm unsure what's going on now) but she was terrible with PMS & I hated it as a child, always getting slapped! Apparently she can't take HRT cos of her high blood pressure, but she is very slight in terms of bones & has little fat other than belly & large breasts (appeared after men. - she's a sz 10-12 with 28 J bra size!) I am concerned for her bone health, but she is set in her ways & won't listen to me. :(

Please explain how osteo in the spine can kill you ? I can't understand as how would that affect the inner organs that keep us alive? Thanksxx
 

SisterBliss

Active member
I've worked in a mental health unit, so I know how ill many are with mental issues, and that there is never enough funding for the department.

I do feel though that once a celeb starts giving interviews about their journey or battle with an ailment, then it becomes bandwagon for the rest of the celebrity world to jump on if it gives then 'coverage'.

Personally I'm fed up with the numerous magazine articles and newspaper column inches given over to the likes of Carol Vorderman, Andrea McLean, Jane McDonald, Chloe Maddeley, the Nolans, Jenny Éclair, Nadya Hussein - the list is endless, of how they coped with anxiety, panic attacks, menopause etc etc.

Surprisingly it hasn't stopped any one of them from stepping in front of the camera in front of millions - quite big in terms of having an anxiety attack I would have thought ? or getting dolled up for yet another red carpet appearance.

Sorry, but those I witnessed in the mental unit, could barely make it through the day - not just once, but for months/years on end with their problems, so I really have no time for Vorderman and the rest of them.
:mysmilie_502::mysmilie_497:

I hear you loud & clear. Makes me so cross & I feel I'm allowed to be as I've suffered for many years before it became 'trendy'.
 

SisterBliss

Active member
Read Myleene Klass's birth story - she lost 5 hours having Apollo - baby, not the god, space shuttle or theatre... To be honest I know the time when our children were born but can't account for the hours after so what's she going on about?
:mysmilie_15:
 

alter ego

VIP Shopper
My Mom is 72 & although her periods stopped perhaps at 60 (after going from Tampax regular to super plus, plus a pad & nighttime changes) she still has dreadful flushes & sweats, see previous post. She didn't seem bitchy when men. was happening, (although if she still has the flushes I'm unsure what's going on now) but she was terrible with PMS & I hated it as a child, always getting slapped! Apparently she can't take HRT cos of her high blood pressure, but she is very slight in terms of bones & has little fat other than belly & large breasts (appeared after men. - she's a sz 10-12 with 28 J bra size!) I am concerned for her bone health, but she is set in her ways & won't listen to me. :(

Please explain how osteo in the spine can kill you ? I can't understand as how would that affect the inner organs that keep us alive? Thanksxx
The medication she was on hastened her death rather than the actual osteoporosis. Having said that, she belonged to an osteo group (it was just about the time osteoporosis was getting more press)and it seemed like every month the group would lose someone else due to a fall breaking bones. It was the most dreaded thing for those ladies and the one man (steroid overdose). Very few managed to come out of hospital alive if they went in with a broken hip or something. It was like they'd give up.

My mum gave up. The pain, the side-effects of the meds. She did say it was truly awful to start having heavy periods again at 66 due to the HRT, too.
 


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